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China's producer prices extend declines amid sluggish demand

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s factory gate prices fell for the fifth consecutive month in June but at a slower-than-expected pace, with persistent deflation in the industrial sector highlighting the lasting economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

The producer price index (PPI) in June fell 3.0% from a year earlier, China’s National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said in a statement on Thursday, compared with a 3.2% fall tipped by a Reuters poll of analysts and a 3.7% decline in May.

But in a sign of modest improvement in the manufacturing sector, PPI rose 0.4% from the previous month, turning around from a 0.4% decline in May.

Chinese officials have said the economy is recovering from the sharp contraction in the January-March quarter when the coronavirus outbreak in the mainland reached its peak and crippled large parts of the economy.

The pandemic, which has infected more than 12 million and killed about 546,000 globally, has sunk world demand and sent many economies into deflation as factories and retailers shut their doors. [nL8N2EF5NQ]

An official survey on the manufacturing sector last week showed that activity expanded at a quicker clip, as Beijing’s success in drastically reducing the number of new coronavirus infections has allowed it to reopen the economy in a welcome boost to business and domestic consumption.

But export orders have continued to contract, reflecting the widespread global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many Chinese manufacturers are grappling with falling profits and have been forced to let workers go to cut costs.

NBS data also showed on Thursday that the consumer prices rose 2.5% from a year earlier, in line with forecasts in a Reuters poll and slightly faster from 2.4% growth in May.

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Seattle man who ploughed through protesters charged with homicide

A lawyer for defendant Dawit Kelete says there was ‘nothing political’ about the ‘horrible, horrible accident’.

Prosecutors in Washington state on Wednesday filed three felony charges against the man who hit two protesters with his car, killing one, while driving on a Seattle highway that was closed for Black Lives Matter demonstrations.

The King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office charged Dawit Kelete, 27, with vehicular homicide, vehicular assault and reckless driving. He is scheduled to be arraigned on July 22 and remains in custody on $1.2m bail.

Kelete drove around vehicles that were parked on the Interstate 5 highway to protect the protesters, hitting two people at about 1:40am on Saturday, according to the Washington State Patrol.

A protester in Seattle was killed and another is in ICU after a car rammed through anti-racism protesters. A suspect is in custody without bail.

Summer Taylor was 24 and worked at a veterinarian clinic. Colleagues said they were “there since day one standing up for Black lives.” pic.twitter.com/qQuREiAWxD

Summer Taylor, a 24-year-old veterinary clinic worker, suffered critical injuries and died on Saturday night. Diaz Love, 32, from Portland, Oregon, was sent to hospital in a serious condition. Prosecutors said Love suffered multiple leg and arm fractures and internal injuries and remains in hospital.

In a note posted on Facebook late Sunday, Love reported being “alive and stable”.

“In a lot of pain. I cannot believe Summer was murdered,” the post said. “If they thought this murder would make us back down, they are very wrong. Very wrong.”

Kelete’s lawyer, John Henry Browne, said his client, who is Black, did not intentionally hit the protesters. He said the crash was a “horrible, horrible accident”.

‘Nothing political’

“There’s absolutely nothing political about this case whatsoever,” Browne told The Associated Press news agency. “My client is in tears. He’s very remorseful. He feels tremendous guilt.”

Kelete is originally from Eritrea, in northeastern Africa, and is a United States citizen, Browne said. He lives with his parents in Seattle, and they are very religious, he said.

A message seeking comment from Black Lives Matter Seattle-King County said they have no comment on the charges.

Kelete was the owner of the Jaguar XJL and was alone in the car, according to the state patrol.

A security camera on the REI building captured Kelete’s car driving the wrong way up the Stewart Street I-5 exit ramp, past numerous warning signs that said “Wrong Way”, according to the charging document. Since it was an exit ramp, “a driver must make a deliberate and sharp right U-turn in order to drive southbound on I-5”, the document said.

Kelete was travelling at highway speeds when he first noticed the demonstrators, the document said.

Protests closed road

The protesters screamed and scattered as the car approached. A graphic video shows the vehicle approaching at high speed. The car appeared to swerve slightly as it came towards two people still in the road and slid sideways as it hit the two protesters, throwing them into the air. The driver slowed and turned on his hazard lights just after impact.

“The defendant stopped several hundred yards from the scene,” prosecutors said. “He was approached by witnesses who yelled at him to exit the vehicle. After the witness began hitting and pushing his vehicle, the defendant drove away at a high speed,” prosecutors said.

Kelete was followed by one of the protesters, who was able to stop his car by driving in front of him until state troopers arrived. Kelete agreed to take a field sobriety test for drugs and alcohol. The tests showed he was not impaired, the state patrol said.

“The driver was reserved and appeared sullen throughout his time in custody,” Trooper James McGuire wrote in the arrest report. “At one point he asked if the injured pedestrians were OK.”

Seattle has been the site of prolonged unrest following the May police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, which sparked nationwide protests.

The state patrol closed a section of I-5 for 19 days in a row because of the protesters, troopers said. Going forward, officials said they would not allow protesters to enter I-5 and would arrest any pedestrians found on the highway.

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Business

Kenneth Lai promoted to OCBC's head of global treasury

SINGAPORE (THE BUSINESS TIMES) – Banking veteran Kenneth Lai was named OCBC’s new head of global treasury effective on Oct 1, in an internal appointment that is part of the bank’s leadership renewal.

He will be reporting directly to OCBC’s group chief executive officer Samuel Tsien, and will also be appointed as a member of the bank’s management committee.

Mr Lai will be taking over from Lam Kun Kin, senior executive vice-president and head of global treasury, who is retiring after 33 years in the financial industry.

Having joined OCBC in 2012 as head of international treasury, Mr Lai managed all international treasury centres under OCBC Bank.

Under his watch, he had “significantly expanded and strengthened the bank’s international treasury operations, product and market coverage, as well as earnings contribution”, according to a statement by OCBC.

After the acquisition of Hong Kong’s Wing Hang Bank in 2014 to become OCBC Wing Hang Bank, Mr Lai also helped to transform the two treasury platforms in Hong Kong into a hub covering North Asia.

Since 2015, he has also been responsible for the bank’s asset and liability management globally, strengthening its liquidity deployment and funding centralisation.

Prior to OCBC, his 30-year career spanned different geographies in Asia and different functions across trading, sales and asset liability management.

He last worked for Ta Chong Bank in Taiwan, where he was appointed as head of financial markets by the Carlyle Group to help revamp its investment buyout.

Between 2001 and 2008, he held several key appointments with ABN AMRO Bank in Singapore, including Asia head of local markets FX and Asia head of institutional sales, as well as its head of global markets Malaysia based in Kuala Lumpur. He started his career at Banker Trust Company and has also worked for other financial institutions including Merrill Lynch and Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.

On the appointment, Mr Tsien noted that Mr Lai is “no stranger to OCBC”, whose “strong leadership and business acumen have enabled him to significantly expand and strengthen the operations”. This has increased the earnings contribution of all overseas treasury centres, he pointed out.

Mr Lai’s additional role in asset liability management has also enhanced the bank’s liquidity management capabilities and funding optimisation, he said.

Mr Tsien added: “Ken’s latest appointment is another testimony of how we actively manage ahead for succession planning where we review regularly our mid to senior-level management bench strength on a forward-looking basis.”

He also thanked the outgoing Mr Lam for his contributions over the past 13 years. Mr Lam had joined OCBC in 2007 as executive vice-president and head of global treasury, and then appointed senior executive vice-president in 2011. In addition to global treasury, Mr Lam oversaw the Bank’s Global Investment Banking from 2012 to February 2020.

“Not only has Kun Kin enhanced the business models which have expanded our regional diversification and strengthened our customer engagement, he has built a strong work culture in the trading room that promotes prudent risk taking and control,” said Mr Tsien. “He has also invested in a robust infrastructure centred on active utilisation of technology. We greatly appreciate Kun Kin’s dedication and leadership in building our business franchise and wish him well in his retirement.”

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Australia warns citizens of increased risk of detention in Hong Kong

SYDNEY (REUTERS) – Australia warned its citizens and residents in Hong Kong that they were at “increased risk of detention” there and urged them to reconsider their need to remain in the Chinese territory.

In an updated travel advisory issued on Thursday (July 9), the government said Hong Kong’s new national security law could be interpreted broadly and Australians may be at risk of getting deported to mainland China for prosecution.

The full extent of the law and how it will be applied are not yet clear, the advisory said.

Australia on Tuesday warned its citizens that they might be at risk of arbitrary detention in China. 

 Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison will on Thursday announce measures to assist Hong Kong citizens, including visas and changes to an extradition agreement, two government sources told Reuters. 

The pending announcement comes after Australia’s Foreign Minister Marise Payne held a teleconference with her counterparts in the Five Eyes security arrangement, which includes the US, about Hong Kong overnight, the sources said. 

Morrison has previously signalled Australia might follow Britain in offering visas to Hong Kong citizens after China imposed a new security law on the city. 

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Dollar steadies near multi-week lows, yuan shines again

TOKYO (Reuters) – The dollar nursed losses against most currencies on Thursday as a rally in riskier assets such as global equities and commodities put a dent in safe-haven demand for the U.S. currency.

China’s yuan rose to a four-month high against the greenback, extending recent gains as investors of all stripes increase positions in Chinese stocks due to growing optimism about the world’s second-largest economy.

Lingering worries about the spread of the coronavirus and a light calendar in Asia could keep some currency pairs in a tight range, but the dollar’s losses are gradually increasing as sentiment favours riskier bets on long-term economic growth.

“Rising stocks and a dip in Treasury yields are slight negatives for the dollar, but the market can’t move too far because we still have to worry about the virus,” said Minori Uchida, head of global market research at MUFG Bank.

“A lot of major U.S. economic data have been positive, so this will be less of a trading factor going forward. People are looking for cues from stocks, yields, and hedging costs.”

The dollar bought 0.9381 Swiss franc CHF= on Thursday in Asia, close to the lowest in almost four months.

Against the euro EUR=, the dollar was quoted at $1.1339, close to a three-week low.

The euro could get a boost later in the day as Germany is scheduled to release export data. Economists expect shipments from the euro zone’s largest economy to rebound sharply in May from a large decline in the previous month.

The greenback was also close to a three-week low against the pound GBP=, last trading at $1.2613.

Sterling held steady at 89.91 pence per euro EURGBP=D3.

The dollar was little changed at 107.33 yen JPY=.

Asian stocks rose on Thursday, following gains in the tech-heavy Nasdaq .IXIC to a record closing high on Wednesday.

The onshore yuan CNY=CFXS rose to 6.9875 per dollar, breaking past the closely watched level of 7 to reach the highest since March 17.

China’s currency has been a star performer against the dollar as investors shrug off diplomatic tension between Washington and Beijing to focus on China’s improving economy and its attractive technology sector.

The yuan has risen around 2.6% from a seven-month trough against the dollar set on May 27.

While some investors are reluctant to take big positions before the traditional summer holiday season amid uncertainty around the coronavirus pandemic, analysts said sentiment favours more U.S. dollar declines as investors try to look past a recent spike in coronavirus cases in some countries.

Elsewhere in currencies, the Australian dollar AUD=D3 stood at $0.6978, close to its strongest level in a month.

The New Zealand dollar NZD=D3 was little changed at $0.6573, also close to a one-month high.

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Business

Ford's second-quarter China vehicle sales rise 3% year-on-year to 158,589 units

BEIJING (Reuters) – Ford Motor Co (F.N) said on Thursday that its China vehicle sales rose 3% between April and June this year from a year earlier to 158,589 units.

The Dearborn, Michigan-based company said in a statement that the sales rise was driven by “strong demand following the lifting of COVID-19 pandemic restrictions.”

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Japan's machinery orders tick up but factory demand patchy

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s machinery orders unexpectedly rose in May, offering policymakers some comfort capital expenditure has held up despite the hit to corporate profits from the coronavirus pandemic.

But the increase in headline orders was due to demand from the services sector, masking a plunge in external and manufacturing orders, clouding the outlook for Japan’s export-reliant economy.

“The gain is likely to be one-off given weak demand from sectors like automobile, capital goods and general-purpose machinery, which hold the key to capital spending,” said Takeshi Minami, chief economist at Norinchukin Research Institute.

“Japan’s economy may have hit the bottom in May. But capital expenditure likely won’t turn for the better as weak demand and the risk of a second wave of infection discourage manufacturers from boosting non-urgent spending.”

Core orders, a highly volatile data series regarded as a leading indicator of capital spending, rose 1.7% in May after a 12.0% slump in April, the fastest drop since 2018.

The increase confounded a 5.4% drop projected by analysts.

A 15.5% drop in manufacturers’ orders was offset by a 17.7% increase in orders by non-manufacturers, the Cabinet Office data showed on Thursday.

Overseas orders sank 18.5% from May to the lowest level since 2010, a sign the pandemic was hurting global demand.

“Machinery orders are hovering on a weak note,” the Cabinet Office said, maintaining its assessment from May.

Japan slipped into recession in the first quarter as the hit from the pandemic added to woes for firms and households already reeling from last year’s tax hike and soft global demand.

But capital expenditure has been underpinned by investment demand for automation and technology to offset a chronic labour shortage in the fast-ageing population.

Big firms expect to increase capital expenditure by 3.2% in the current fiscal year to March 2021, the Bank of Japan’s quarterly survey showed last week.

The outlook for capital expenditure will be among key factors the BOJ will scrutinise in guiding monetary policy. It is widely expected to hold off on expanding stimulus at next week’s rate review, after easing policy in March and April.

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Kings Island theme park employee tests positive for coronavirus

Easing coronavirus restrictions allows Chicago zoos, museums to reopen

FOX Business’ Grady Trimble breaks down the new coronavirus safety measures at Lincoln Park Zoo in Illinois as more businesses in Chicago reopen.

One of Ohio’s biggest amusement parks has confirmed an employee has tested positive for coronavirus, according to a report from FOX 19 NOW.

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Kings Island issued a statement Wednesday that shared the news about its associate’s testing status.

SIX FLAGS TO REOPEN FIRST THEME PARK, IMPLEMENT NEW SAFETY MEASURES

FOX Business reached out to Kings Island for comment on its next step but the theme park’s staff did not immediately respond at the time of publication.

Ticker Security Last Change Change %
FUN CEDAR FAIR 27.61 -0.24 -0.86%

The employee was screened before their shift in accordance with CDC guidelines, according to a statement from Kings Island’s Communications Director Chad Showalter, FOX 19 NOW reported.

UNIVERSAL TAKES FIRST STEPS REVIVING ORLANDO THEME PARK BUSINESS

“Our policy as it pertains to any associate confirmed to have tested positive for COVID-19 is to send that individual home for 14 days or until they test negative. Simultaneously, any associate(s) identified as having close contact with an associate who has tested positive will also be sent home for 14 days or until they test negative,” Showalter’s statement continued. “The workstation and general workplace where the affected associate(s) work will be sanitized and will not reopen to other associates or guests until proper cleaning of the facility has been completed.”

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Kings Island has been open under limited capacity for season passholders since July 2, according to the theme park’s owner, Cedar Fair Entertainment Company, which also operates the Cedar Point theme park in Ohio. Kings Island is scheduled to reopen to the public on Friday, July 10, according to its current calendar.

Reservations are required for entry along with a previsit health screening declaration 24 hours prior to admission, the park’s updated policies state. Additionally, the park has required face masks for all guests, associates and vendors due to the coronavirus pandemic. Social distancing and use of the park’s hand sanitization stations are encouraged.

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Cedar Fair’s theme parks aren’t the only ones reopening to the public during the pandemic. All of Disney’s parks will be reopen by mid-July with an exception of Disneyland in California. Dollywood in Tennessee has been open since June 17 and Hersheypark in Pennsylvania has been open since July 3.

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Denver on track for deadliest year in a decade after week of violence that killed 8, wounded 11

A surge of shootings and stabbings in early July puts Denver on track to have its deadliest year in the past decade.

In the first eight days of the month, eight people were killed in homicides in Denver and 10 others were shot or stabbed, but survived. Forty-six people have died in homicides in the city so far this year.

“This is a fairly significant uptick in violence — both in homicides and shootings,” Denver Police Chief Paul Pazen said.

Between Jan. 1 and July 8 of 2019, 30 people had been killed. In 2018, the deadliest year in the past decade for the city, the number of people killed in homicides didn’t reach 46 until the end of August.

It’s too soon to tell if the incidents over the past week are connected or if there are trends, Pazen said. The shootings and stabbings in the last week span every one of the department’s six districts, with some hotspots of concentrated violence, the chief said. Three incidents took place in the Central Business District, three in Park Hill and three in Montbello.

But community organizers and anti-gang activists said that some of the violence can be traced to a resurgence of conflict between long-established Bloods and Crips as well as a continuing trend of young people killing each other.

“You have a couple of different battles in a couple of different fronts, fought in different ways,” said Jason McBride, program assistant and education specialist at Gang Rescue and Support Project. “We’re spinning out of control right now.”

Anti-violence organizers warned in the fall and early this year that an already deadly trend of youth violence would become worse this summer, when teens were out of school. Then the pandemic made everything worse.

For months, Joel Hodge had been leading patrols of the neighborhoods in northeast Denver to help kids and to interrupt violence before it happened. When the pandemic hit, his organization, Struggle of Love Foundation, pivoted to another crushing need: hunger. Since March, the group has been giving out thousands of meals and bags of groceries to those in need.

“When people were crying out, we responded,” Hodge said.

But that meant the patrols fell by the wayside, Hodge said. The recent violence even claimed one of his young volunteers, 19-year-old Tayvion Washington. Hodge helped the teen graduate high school and continued to mentor him.

Washington was shot and killed Monday in the 2900 block of Poplar Street in North Park Hill.

“He was supposed to be at the food bank at 9 that morning,” Hodge said.

The pandemic trapped a lot of young people in their homes for a long time, during which they fought and argued over social media, McBride said. Now that restrictions have lifted, some of the pent up conflict is turning to violence.

The pandemic also means that many summer programs don’t exist, leaving young people unsupervised while their parents work multiple shifts to earn a living, McBride said.

“You can drive any day of the week, through Green Valley Ranch and Montbello and along Chambers Road and you’ll see 75, 80, 100 kids just walking because they have nothing to do,” McBride said. “There’s nowhere for them to go that’s positive.”

When McBride showed up Monday for a vigil for a young man killed in Montbello, he found himself standing near another crime scene for a shooting that happened in the same block less than 24 hours after the first homicide.

“It’s ridiculous,” he said.

Two days after that vigil, another shooting killed two more people less than a block away. The loss of life and potential is heartbreaking.

“We’re not getting to them before they end up dead,” McBride said. “We’re not meeting them at their level.”

Other large cities across the country witnessed an explosion of violence over the Fourth of July weekend and the following week. Fourteen people were killed and at least 92 others were wounded in shootings in Chicago between midday Friday and early Monday, The Chicago Tribune reported. The governor of Georgia called a state of emergency after five people were killed and 26 others were injured in shootings in Atlanta during the holiday weekend.

Crime trends in large cities across the U.S. are strikingly different than previous years, an analysis by The New York Times found. Overall crime and general violent crime is down in those cities, compared to 2019, but homicides are spiking.

Despite fears that domestic violence killings would spike during stay-at-home orders, the number of domestic violence homicides in Denver has remained level compared to last year, Pazen said. Through the end of June, the police department believes that more than half of killings here were connected to a robbery or a dispute, like over a parking space or a dog.

“We’re trying to get the message out that senseless violence is not the answer,” Pazen said.

Protests of police and in Denver and across the country haven’t affected the police department’s ability to solve crimes so far, Pazen said. The department has solved 70% of the homicides that happened in the first six months of 2020, slightly above the national average of 62% reported in 2018, the most recent year available, Pazen said.

“The only way we can resolve this as a community is by working together,” he said. “The police can’t do this by themselves.”

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How one woman’s stolen identity exposed China exam fraud

This week around 10 million students across China have sat the Gaokao – a college entrance exam which determines their entire future.

Hanging over their heads, though, is the recent revelation that hundreds of other students before them were victim to an identity theft scandal which saw them robbed of their results.

For Chen Chunxiu, it was an exam that could change everything. Doing well in the Gaokao meant the farmer’s daughter had a shot of getting into her dream university. Failing meant it would remain just that – a dream.

She failed.

Denied admission to college, she took up various jobs – a factory worker, a waitress – before eventually becoming a kindergarten teacher.

But 16 years later, she found to her shock that she had, in fact, earned a place at the Shandong University of Technology – and enrolled there.

But it hadn’t been her. Her score – and in fact, her entire identity – was stolen by a girl whose relatives had pulled strings to make this happen.

Her case is just one of 242 student identity thefts that took place in Shandong province between 2002 and 2009, according to recent media reports.

A shocking tale of systemic cheating

The notoriously hard Gaokao – or “high school exam” – tests school leavers on their Chinese, maths, English and another subject of their choice.

It has been the focal point of the education system since the 1950s, with a break during the Cultural Revolution.

But it’s not just an exam. For millions – especially those in less privileged positions – it’s the ticket to success and upward mobility.

The family of Ms Chen, whose story has been widely covered in China in recent weeks, had high hopes.

Because they lived in poverty and could only afford to fund one child’s education, they made her less academically-inclined older brother drop out of school to make way for her. This was rare in rural China, where typically the education of boys has been prioritised over that of girls.

It was with this hope that Ms Chen took the Gaokao in 2004. Back then, university students in China did not receive rejection letters – if you didn’t receive an acceptance letter, the assumption was simply that you didn’t get in.

So after waiting until September – when the university term usually begins – Ms Chen accepted that no letter was coming and decided to head to work in the city.

Then in May this year, she decided to enrol herself into a course for adults. Entering her details in an official government website, Ms Chen found that it listed her as having enrolled and entered university in 2004 and graduated in 2007.

But the picture shown wasn’t her. Slowly but surely, the truth started to emerge – revealing the shocking extent of cheating that had taken place.

According to state news outlet Xinhua, the imposter’s uncle – who was a local official – is accused of getting help from a local admissions director, who was able to access Ms Chen’s exam information.

Ms Chen had scored 546 out of 750, compared to her imposter, who had scored 303.

The imposter’s father then allegedly intercepted Ms Chen’s admissions letter at the county post office before it was posted. With help from Ms Chen’s high school principal, say reports, they faked an entirely new high school transcript bearing the imposter’s details.

The imposter’s relatives also worked with a police director and staff from the Shandong University of Technology to ensure the enrolment went through and that a blind eye was turned, it is alleged. Ms Chen – a relatively poor farmer’s daughter – did not stand a chance.

The imposter – whose real name is Chen Yanping – then assumed the identity of Ms Chen.

Until today, the imposter’s colleagues still know her as Chen Chunxiu, say media reports. Her degree has since been revoked and she has been sacked from her job. A government report says she is still under investigation.

“I want to ask her in person why she stole my identity,” the real Ms Chen told China’s CCTV in an interview. “You replaced me – what did you expect to happen to me? Are you so selfish?”

Her story has been met with widespread anger: many have questioned the point of working so hard for years for an exam that on the surface, promised equal opportunities for all.

“[Some people] have no idea how important the Gaokao is for those not so well off. Parents work so hard to support their kids… but their way is blocked by those with power,” said one person on Weibo.

‘What can a farmer do?’

According to Chu Zhaohui, a researcher at China’s National Institute of Education Sciences, Gaokao fraud can be divided into two sorts – the kind where where the victim has no idea and the other, where both parties mutually consent to it, perhaps for a fee.

The first category he says, typically involves oversight from more than just one party.

“Enrolment generally involves many parties – schools, examination institutes, enrolment offices, and household management department. So, if there’re loopholes in so many links, it can only show that it is… collaborative cheating”, Mr Chu told BBC Chinese.

In such cases victims are usually in “low social positions” and hence have little way of fighting back, even if they do eventually find out, he adds, as was the case for Ms Chen’s father.

“What can a farmer do?” he asked Chinese media. “If I was powerful, they wouldn’t have dared [do this to her].”

At China’s parliament meeting last month, there were calls for college admission identity theft to be criminalised. One delegate said it was “much more harmful than [monetary] theft”.

Officials in Shandong say new processes are now in place to make sure such incidents will not happen again.

Students will need to submit their offer letter, identity card, residential certificate and an exam attendance certificate before their admission can be confirmed. University acceptance results will also be published online and sent via text message.

And Prof Cheng Fangping, at Renmin University, told BBC Chinese that as student documents were now largely online it was harder for them to be doctored.

The Ministry of Education has also announced that any students found to be involved in identity theft will not be allowed to enrol in university.

Local authorities have launched an investigation into Chen Chunxiu’s case and 46 people have been punished.

Ms Chen is now trying to claim back what should have been her life, and she appealed to be re-admitted to the Shandong university.

After her initial rejection was met with public uproar, the university later said it would “actively strive” to help Ms Chen “realise her wishes”.

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